Fixed Up

Replaced the worn chain on my bike, tightened a few loose screws on my front rack.  Bike damage was almost all superficial.  I gave Rey a nice alleyway drivetrain cleaning and he’s ready to roll.

Solomon damage is moderate…I’m still sore today in my shoulder and hip and will decide tomorrow morning if I will depart Kosice.  A plug for an excellent product – hydrogel dressings (available in name brand or generic in US) are perfect for road rash; they keep the area wet for healing.  The dressings got me out clean of a real nasty road rash on my face back in early 2010.  I left large chunks of my sweater on the road…good thing it wasn’t all me.

As a bonus, all of my gear is washed, dried and clean.  I bought a Ukraine map and have plotted my way to Odessa, around 1000km.  It’s a big country, but flat once I pass the Carpathians.  Weather is unpredictable as usual…beautiful skies yet thunderstorms were almost certain in the afternoon.

Weeping Hammer and Sickle

Weeping Hammer and Sickle

And some photos I missed!

High Tatras.  This was the best view I got!  2665m ASL

High Tatras. This was the best view I got! 2665m ASL

Torqued

Torqued

Typical Slovak town

Typical Slovak medium-size town

Roma in the South

I’m caved out – seen enough of these on this tour.  My final trip was to Ochinska argonitova, a cave with argonite decoration.  It’s beautiful, though not as magnificent as the ice caves.  The argonite in this cave grows in clumps that look very similar to coral polyps; I did a double-take when I first entered as I thought I was on a dive!

I bike on the 549 – a windy sleepy road which sees few tourists.  In patches of heavy rain, I stop in local bars for a coffee (or a cafe-vodka shot when people are very friendly!).  All of my sleeping gear is wet with no chance of drying.  Maros informed me the south is economically poorer than the Vah river valley which I had ridden from Bratislava – I saw this firsthand while riding through Medzev.

Off on the side of the road, I spot a Roma (gypsy) settlement.  There are people walking in the middle of the single road.  It had rained hard for the past few days and there are small lakes outside the beat-up broken-down buildings.  Some children are playing in the gray-green lakes, some are raking trash into an ever growing heap almost as large as a building.  Holes where windows should be, holes where holes shouldn’t be. Colorful clotheslines.  Tin roof shacks.  It is amazing that entire groups of people live in such poverty and unsanitary conditions in an EU nation.  I didn’t have the heart to take pictures.

The scene reminds me of an experience I had in Madagascar.  My mother, grandfather, aunt and myself were visiting my sister who was in the Peace Corps at the time.  One of the first line items of the tour was the capitol building, perched at the top of a hill in Antananarivo.  I can’t remember the specifics as this trip was a while ago, but the capitol was spectacular – well maintained and what one would expect of a “Westernized” capitol building.  When we looked outside of the low fence surrounding the building, we saw slum.  Separated by only a few meters; they could be worlds apart.

Only what I saw in Medzev was worse – hundreds of people living on the unsanitary river bank, children not in school on a Thursday afternoon.  Like many things in Europe, the inertia of culture and history make change more difficult than what I am accustomed to in the US.

My ride to Kosice was wonderful.  I was on my descent to the city when I said to myself, “wow, that oil on the road makes beautiful rainbow patterns” just as my two wheels slipped out from under me.  I was rolling around 25km/h but the crash wasn’t terrible as the inertia of my panniers made the trip to the pavement a little slower than usual.  The car behind me managed to avoid my body on the ground but didn’t even slow down to ask for assistance.  I picked myself off the ground and got the bike out of the road.  Cuts on my right arm and a pain in my hip; luckily my long-sleeve wool sweater took the brunt of the road rash.  I cleaned my wound on-site with my medkit (alcohol prep pads, bactine, large bandages). Bike is somewhat f-ed up…I ditch my pride and open my wallet to the nearest hotel where I’ll lay low for a night or two.

Happy with shelter from the heavy rain

Happy with shelter from the heavy rain

Gothic Church

Gothic Church

Water faucet in a small city.

Water faucet in a small town

Campsite #84625322

Campsite #84625322.  Gotta watch for bears out here.

I really liked this church.  In retrospect I don't know what caught my eye buy maybe it catch yours.

I really liked this church. In retrospect I don’t know what caught my eye but maybe it will catch yours.

Top of a hill in the Slovak Karst National Park

Top of a hill in the Slovak Karst National Park

Hairpin

Hairpin

 

 

 

 

Tatra

It’s a cold morning in Slovak Paradise the fog envelops and creates a mobile bubble of solitude as I ride broken only by the large Tatra trucks moving trees from the top of the mountains to the bottom and make rough noise and fill my lungs with caustic smell.

I can only see a few meters in front of me hopefully the trucks behind me can see my bright light and don’t swerve like a car with too many beers around the same potholes I do windy like the electrical wiring in these old buildings I climb the mountain but where does it lead with my prior knowledge and navigation abilities it will lead me where I want.

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Like that Kerouac special?  It’s been a rewarding few days of riding.  The endorphins from climbing these mountains (large hills by California standards) has been great, greyed only by the weather.  I camped near the High Tatras the other night, but the cloud layer was so low I only got a few glances of the highest peak around 2600m ASL.  I toured the magnificent Dobasina Ice Cave this morning.  Truly an amazing area – layers of ice build through the centuries.  Now at a cafe with my map, because planning is better done in a warm room over a cup of coffee.

The cities of Slovakia are predictable.  The larger cities have a center with a few nice statues and fountains, cobblestone and pedestrian friendly.  Streets radiating like spokes to a ring outside the center where public transit in the form of buses and electric trolley rotate.  The population is concentrated a brisk walk or a quick bus ride away in tall apartment complexes.  These apartment complexes are an artifact of the communist system.  This allows for a large population and heavy foot traffic in the center of the city without it starting to sprawl.  The opposite of suburbs.

My food count:
* bananas, 3
* carrots, 4, medium size
* olive oil, 10ml
* sunflower seeds, 30g
* yogurt, 1.5%, 375g
* pasta, 500g
* mandarin oranges, 8
* gogi berries, dried, 150g
* pork deli meat, 100g
* bananas, dried, 100g (I thought this was ginger!)
* sheep cheese, 120g
* oatmeal w/ fruit and nuts, 200g
* kolbasa sausage, 2
* apricots, dries, 40g
* bread, 1 loaf
* oatmeal, 400g
* instant coffee, 75g
* breadstick and 40g nutella packet for dessert

My meals aren’t organic local bio farm fresh sustainably harvested cage free fair trade non gmo but in the next few days I feel like I eat meals fit for a King.

Lonely in the Mountains

The past few days I have struggled with intense loneliness – different than what I have ever experienced – so many people and civilization around, but I am a stranger.  I frequently have charade-conversations with people, but these hardly form any meaningful connections.  I certainly miss intelligent conversation, but I let it all out when I’m with hosts.  I sit here enjoying the first sun I have seen in three days.  My wet tent and gear enjoy it as well.

Today, I ride to the base of the High Tatra mountains.  I will then head South towards the Karst region to see more caves.  My route has taken a significant deviation from my original plan: once I have visited the caves, I will head East to Ukraine.  This is the point of no return – the Schengen Agreement will not allow me to return to EU countries.  I will pass over the Carpathian mountains and into the Ukraine lowlands and travel to Odessa where I will take the ferry to Georgia.

Why skip Turkey?  This was a big decision.  It came down to these guys.  I’m generally cautious of anecdotal evidence, but every single bike tourer who went through Turkey has had wild encounters (including bites and rabies) with Kangal and stray dogs.  These are not isolated incidents – daily encounters with territorial dogs is not my idea of a fun ride.  I’m also pretty scared of dogs in general – I wasn’t raised as a “dog person” and my family never had dogs growing up.

So that’s it – I’m saving Turkey for a later date.

Old bar.  The bathroom had a fist punch through the door - I guess this is why my beer cost $0.70.

Old bar. The bathroom had a fist punch through the door – I guess this is why my beer cost $0.70.

Storm clouds approaching

Storm clouds approaching

No caption

No caption necessary

Off-roading

Off-roading

OK, maybe a little too much off-roading for my weight

OK, maybe a little too much off-roading for my tire loading

I arrived in Zilina at the same time as Michal, my host through warmshowers.org.  He’s a busy post-doc, but we found the time to have a fine dinner (complete with cake!) and tell me about a local project he is involved in, Stanica.  It’s a bright point in a fairly dreary city – a budding alternative culture is thriving at this local train stop.  Seminars, art shows, and plays are taking place daily.  Unfortunately, I missed the dance show but when I was there I met the three performers at the cafe.  Two men from the US, one from Slovakia – Matthew, from the US, showed me the studio.  Much to my surprise, it’s located inside a support for the highway.

There's a dance studio / theater inside this highway support

There’s a dance studio / theater inside this highway support

This building in Zilina has great geometry

This building in Zilina has great geometry

Low Tatras

Low Tatras

Demonovska cave system.  One of the caves I toured here was full of ice formations

Demonovska cave system. One of the caves I toured here was full of ice formations

Sunset in the Low Tatras

Sunset in the Low Tatras

Slovak Country

My path through Slovakia turns to the North and East as I follow the Váh river valley to the high mountains in Eastern Slovakia.

Storm Clouds

Storm Clouds

I find an organic farm in a forest near a small city on the way to Nové Mesto.  It’s actually the farm that supplies the pub where I had the dumplings in the previous post!  The menu was nearly identical.  I made friends with Martin, and in exchange for a backscratch he lazily watched my bike while I was in the bathroom.

Meow what seems to be the problem here?

Meow what seems to be the problem here?

My campsite had a great vista of Piešťany, a “spa town” with hot springs and healing waters and such.  After the last night’s hard ride and a recreational 20km ride up to Nové Mesto that day, I decided to do the spa thing.  I saw a sign for a salt cave – sounds good, it may clear up my residual stuffy nose.  The cave itself was hardly a cave: more like an artificial hole in the ground with some salt stalactites complete with eerie fiber optic lights at the tips.  Hard to tell if it did anything but it felt pretty nice to relax for a few hours and not be on my bike.  I relaxed a bit more and got back in the saddle to meet with Maros, a host I met through warmshowers.org.

DSC02988

Maros is a driven man full of life, stories, and passion for cycling.  On a pub-crawl tour of the city, he told me stories of his travels to the USA where he and his Slovakian friends pulled themselves up by their boostraps and made money the hard way after the breakup of the Soviet Union.  He worked as a construction worker, a Carl’s Jr employee (at the same time), an odd-job helper around a Veteran’s house, and a bicycle-rickshaw driver in San Diego. He also told me an amazing story where he made a 1.5 meter satellite dish with his father in Soviet Czechoslovakia and witnessed the riots in Prague just before the fall of the Soviet Union!  Maros is now an Electrical Engineer with a wife and child, responsible for customers all over Eastern Europe.

At the local spring

At the local spring

Maros showed me a local spring (I love these!) and castle ruins with a view fit for a King.  The ride up to the castle was pretty intense – we were rewarded with a crystal clear view of the Váh river valley.

On the castle road

On the castle road

 

Part of the trail

Part of the trail

A King's View

A King’s View

DSC03022

DSC03025

Starting Slovakia

Sad building on a dreary morning in Bratislava

Sad building on a dreary morning in Bratislava

Serpent (?) guarding the city center

Serpent guarding the city center

Many layers

Many layers

Strange building in old-town Bratislava

Strange building in old-town Bratislava

Hello old man

Hello old man

OK, a picture of food.  But this one is especially delicious - plum potato dumplings with cottage cheese and coco.  I also ordered a beer and three fruit liquor shots (a Slovakian specialty).  They are Pear, Plum, and Apricot.  I knew they were 110 proof when I ordered them, but 0.05 L seems like a lot less than when they arrived.

OK, a picture of food. But this one is especially delicious – plum potato dumplings with cottage cheese and coco. I also ordered a beer and three fruit liquor shots (a Slovakian specialty). They are Pear, Plum, and Apricot. I knew they were 110 proof when I ordered them, but 0.05 L seems like a lot less than when they arrived.

The simple life.  I actually made these at a hostel in Bratislava one night.  No, I didn't contemplate how many potatoes to plant that spring.

The simple life. I actually made these at a hostel in Bratislava one night. No, I didn’t contemplate how many potatoes to plant that spring.

Serious double windows

Serious double windows

Vienna Respite

My break in Vienna with my grandparents has been excellent!  It came at a fairly good time for me, as my low-grade sinus infection needed time to clear and was causing quite a bit of discomfort riding.  Luckily, I didn’t get them sick…I guess I washed my hands a lot.  I arrived with the grandparents already knowing the city – they had figured out the public transportation and had seen a large part of it through a guided tour after only two days!

The Viennese experience was brightened by Tanja, a University student my grandpa made friends with on the plane.  Tanja was a tour guide for a day and showed us some of the best sights and foods of the area!

Action shot - the young tour guide and the old traveler

Action shot – the young tour guide and the old traveler

In return for Tanja’s guide, my grandpa took us all to an orchestra performance at the Musikverein. Cities with a large tourism industry tend to go over-the-top with some things, Vienna is no exception.  There are Mozart concerts, Mozart home tours, Mozart chocolates, Mozart street performers, Mozart museums…you name it.  The performance was excellent – the conductor put on quite a show!  We also saw a performance of the Spanish Riding School, where the horses are trained to stand on their hind legs while mounted.  The act of standing on their hind legs is very awkward and the closest analogy I can find to the absurdity of the situation is watching the first fish that ventured out of the water onto land!

As is par for the course: plenty of beer and Wiener Melange, a Viennese coffee drink that is so similar to a regular Cappuccino that my uncultured taste buds have yet to find a difference.  Add in a chocolate cake and you have a good lunch:

Downtown lunch

Downtown lunch

I have a few days left of planned low-activity for my sinus infection to clear up, so I’m taking an easy ride down the Danube today to Bratislava, where I will stay for a few nights and plan the next part of the adventure.  I have decided to avoid the rush of Istanbul and save Western Turkey for another trip.  Instead, I will travel the length of Slovakia through a few mountain ranges, and likely into the Ukraine.  Taking a little advice from Radomir, I’m planning my trip a bit more – I have a few must-hit sites in Slovakia, for the high mountains, hot springs, and karsts.

At the robot museum - this is the stuff nightmares are made of.  Maybe early inspiration for the Terminator!

At the robot museum – this is the stuff nightmares are made of. Maybe early inspiration for the Terminator!

Pivo, Grog, and Czech Hospitality

OK, I promise I won’t turn this in to a photo blog!  My brief two nights in Prague were pretty full.  I rolled into the city around sundown with no idea on where to stay (this is a recurring theme, for better or worse).  I eventually find Sir Toby’s Hostel in Praha 7 with a good price and atmosphere – good for me.  As I was locking up my bike, a couple approached me: they looked…oddly similar.  Sven [blog] and Kathrin [blog] are experienced bike tourers traveling roughly the same route as I was!  They both arrived at this hostel the same day because Sven’s bike got stolen from a (relatively) secure hotel in Prague!  Also, Kathrin’s saddle was stolen in Dresden.  Like total pro’s, they are taking it in stride and decided to go south to Woof – work as farmhands on a small farm – for a while.  We cooked dinner together: Sven and Kathrin made a delicious pasta with tomato sauce and I made a mushroom souffle kind of thing.  It’s unfortunate we didn’t get to talk more (I wish we stayed together a bit more!) as they’re super cool people – hopefully we’ll meet up in Istanbul in a while.

Vagrants eyeing my bags

Vagrants eyeing my bags – Prague

I was a tourist in the city for a full day – and it’s exhausting.  People flow like a brisk river through the old city in Prague and is overwhelming for me.  I decided to take my bike into the city (unloaded) which was a mistake – I know now I need to spend at least three days in a city I plan to explore.  Not only is public transit very good in most European cities, but I just want to get off the saddle for a little while. At least I got to see the main attractions, though it was difficult to enjoy Prague and I felt a little frustrated.  With about a week to meet my grandparents in Vienna, I decide to travel back up to the hills in North Bohemia and work my way over to North Moravia.  I hook up on warmshowers.org with Radomir in Šumperk and start my ride.  I knew it was going to be hilly!

Legal (?) campsite on the other side of the railroad tracks

Legal (?) campsite on the other side of the railroad tracks.  Bike up against the bank to avoid detection…

Just an awesome sunset in my wooded campsite

Awesome sunset in my wooded campsite

Fun shot

Fun shot

So hilly.  It wouldn’t be as bad if all the small Czech villages weren’t situated in a massive valley!  Every few kilometers, there’s a steep, often switchback descent to a city – I love feeling the breeze on my face on these.  It’s hard to focus on the descent, though – you can usually see the windy, switchback road OUT of the city!  Finally at the top of the switchbacks: sweaty, probably sunburned, but in high spirits after the endorphins kick in, the sign for the city exit lies at the top of the hill.  Repeat for a dozen cities per day.

Czech county (?) road.  Perfect for cycling.

Czech county (?) road. Perfect for cycling.

After busting my butt across the hills, I make it to Šumperk and Radomir greets me out the window of the fourth floor in his apartment complex.  I meet his girlfriend, Beata, and after washing my clothes in their bathtub, we set off on a small hike in the woods.  We arrive at a large rock with a great view of the surrounding area.  Šumperk is very well situated geographically – surrounded by mountains and near the manifold of two or three separate river streams from the hills/mountains to the North.  A beautiful larger city (~30k population) the city has a lot to offer.  We got diner at a local pub and all had the beef tripe bread bowl soup – amazing!  I needed to press on – Radomir suggested Olomouc to the South and caves across the hills to the South West.

I ride ahead to Olomouc the next day, a short 40km trip.  I was feeling a bit sick (something I haven’t shaken yet!) and when I arrived around 2pm I decided to stay the evening.  There’s only one hostel in town – The Poet’s Corner Hostel.  Believe me, it was amazing!  I met one of the owners, Ian, who was also a bike tourer!  He showed me the good sights around town – easily walkable as the city is smaller.  The city is very dense with attractions yet light with people.  It’s been one of my favorite cities on the trip!  I went up a large tower to get a view of the city, toured churches, walked through old city wall fortifications, and went to a large park which was having an open-air Russian punk concert.  Turns out I don’t really like Russian punk.  I get a Czech classic – a potato pancake.  It was actually more grease than potato by weight!  Not my finest hour, but my body yearned for calories.

Double helix in Olomouc

Double helix in Olomouc

Bomb shelter to protect the communists from the capitalists

Bomb shelter to protect the communists from the capitalists

I woke up early and rode to the West to make it to the small city of Sloup to see the caves Radomir spoke of.  The plan was to scope these out for future cave-diving use with the crew back in LA.  There’s hundreds of caves from two or three systems in the area, but only five caves open to the public.  Asking the tour guides about cave diving was difficult – they didn’t know a whole lot outside ‘roll the tape’, plus the language barrier wasn’t helping.  At least the area was very nice and reasonably populated, which will make diving logistics easier for my return.

Waterfall - in the Sloup-Šošůvka cave

Waterfall – in the Sloup-Šošůvka cave

Damn I love the Czech Republic - even this super industrial building has a bier garden.  I ended up staying in a family's lawn in Blansko this evening because....hey, living frugally is fun.

Damn I love the Czech Republic – even this super industrial building has a bier garden.

After touring my first cave, I rode to the nearest city – Blansko.  It was getting dark and I didn’t have a place to stay (recurring theme, remember!).  After going to the information map and finding a hostel (YES!), my spirits were high and I rode on.  I arrive at the hostel only to find it has been converted to an apartment complex.  No luck, and by this time it’s pretty dark.  I decide to stay at a hotel – something I don’t enjoy doing because it’s expensive and very much out of my character.  I find the cheapest one through the free internet near the information booth.  The rooms are above a smoky bar which doesn’t look like it’s closing anytime soon.  I find someone who speaks a meager amount of English, motioning if I can get a room and a place to lock my bike up.  He shakes his head – no rooms available.  Arrgggh!

I look at my GPS – gotta find a forest to camp, right now.  No such luck – the forest is all on embankments with houses poking out.  I decide to put plan C into action – begging for a place to stay.  I ring the buzzer of a house in the middle of the city which looks like it has a garden.  A man sticks his head out the window (I guess this is common in CZ).  I explain slowly in English that I’m traveling from Sweden to …. he closes the window.  A moment later, another large man – someone who you wouldn’t get into an argument with at a bar – opens the main door.  I explain slowly in English that I’m traveling from Sweden to … and out comes a boy about 13 years old.  I ask if he speaks English – Yes – success!  I explain slowly in English that I’m traveling from Sweden to Azerbaijan and I would like to set up my tent in their yard for the night.  He asks his father (?) and immediately says “no problem”.  The don’t-mess-with-me-man-in-a-sleeveless-shirt-and-short-shorts shows me the way to a small plot where I can set up my tent.  The boy offers me use of the shower which I gladly take.  I set up my tent in record time and fall asleep.

Czech golden fields

Golden Czech fields

Wine cellars built into the bank!

Wine cellars built into the bank!

The next morning I wake up early and get on the road, attempting to hit to the border of the Czech Republic and Austria that day.  I ride…and ride….and ride.  One hundred and ten kilometers in to the hilly journey, I’m getting tired and making mistakes.  I realize I don’t have a whole lot left in me – luckily I made good progress and Vienna is in reach for tomorrow.

Last Czech evening for a while

Last Czech evening for a while

The ride to Vienna was terrible.  Traffic and no shoulder on a busy highway.  There’s not too many other options, unfortunately, and I needed to get in to Vienna in the afternoon.

Pigging out on licorice in Vienna before the Grandparents get back to their hotel room

Pigging out on licorice in Vienna before the Grandparents get back to their hotel room

Here they are!  Wonderful that I have such adventurous grandparents.

Here they are! Wonderful that I have such adventurous grandparents.

North Bohemia

So.  Many. Hills.

Czech National Forest (I think)

Czech National Forest (I think)

 

Found a random spring in the middle of the forest.  There's a church built on top.  Apparently the water is "magic" and also good for the eyes.  I filled up all of my water containers to the brim.

Found a spring in the middle of the forest. There’s a church built on top. Apparently the water is “magic” and also good for the eyes. I filled up all of my water containers to the brim.

Pass-through on a series of crazy switchbacks

Pass-through on a series of crazy switchbacks

Sot from the top!

Shot from the top!

How about now?

How about now?

Awesome formations

Awesome formations

In the valley

In the valley

Random castle about 7km away; this is what I get for not planning my route.

Random castle about 7km away; this is what I get for not planning my route.

I get to share the woods with this guy

I get to share the woods with this guy

The Hills Begin

Berlin is a great city – vibrant, large, full of green parks and beer.  I stayed with Katharina for two nights – I got to do some of the things that are less practical while camping:

The glam touring lifestyle

The glam touring lifestyle…thanks Katharina!  This drying rack is much better than the back of my dirty panniers

The city streets are getting less bike friendly.  Cobblestones of all sizes mixed with large curbs and a heavy rig make riding in here feel like pushing a full shopping cart while operating a jackhammer.  Due to a combination of the importance of my punctuality in Austria and uncertain terrain in the Czech Republic, I felt the need to take the train from Berlin to Dresden.  This turned out to be mostly unnecessary – my riding distance and stamina have improved greatly and covering 120km a day over hilly terrain isn’t as sapping as it used to be.

Sunset over the Berlin Wall

Sunset over the Berlin Wall

The road to Berlin - Spring is here

The road to Berlin – Spring is here

Rey now sports a top bin

Rey now sports a top bin

Now in Dresden, I take a very simple bike path – the Elbe river.  There is a terrific bike lane going right through the mountain pass to the Czech Republic lined with beer gardens.  After a heavy drizzle, I stopped at a deserted garden for cover.  Shortly afterwards, two cyclists roll up and I introduce myself.  Stefan and Anka were on a short trip to he Czech Republic for a few beers, then to Dresden for the May Day festival.  A big holiday over here; bonfires are lit and witch effigies are burned.  After pouring down two pilsners each, the rain showed that it was here to stay.  We needed to get a move on, so we rode in opposite directions into the rain.

Road to the Czech Republic - view from the cockpit

Road to the Czech Republic – view from the cockpit

Damn this rig is heavy.  The LHT is a little too beefy for my use!

Damn this rig is heavy. The LHT is a little too beefy for my use!

The pass into the Czech Republic is amazing – full of green, mossy forest under a steep rocky bank.  The steepness and rain made me forgo the normal stealth camping and push on to Děčín for the night.  I get to the city about 10km into the Czech border around 8pm.  There’s two hotels in town, right next to each other.  I walk into the (clearly) budget hotel, above a bar.  I open the door at the top of the stairs and see a middle aged Czech woman behind the counter.  There’s a smaller man, maybe her husband, sitting in a couch behind the reception.  A menthol cigarette is burning in an ashtray as if the man had just put it down.  I can hear the pitter-patter of rain on the opaque plastic ceiling…I asked if she spoke English.  No, only Czech.  I’m getting used to this.

Do I look tired yet?

Do I look tired yet?

The next morning everything is closed for May day.  I push on ahead with Prague about 130km away.  My legs have strengthened and I roll into the outskirts of Prague around sunset.  Now I just have to find a place to sleep.

Roads often just....end.

Roads often just….end.

Road into Prague

Road into Prague